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IMMIGRATION POLICIES, ANALYSIS, AND RESOURCES

The Immigration Domain tracks and reports on policies that deal with illegal and legal immigration, refugee resettlement and sanctuary cities. This domain tracks policies emanating from the White House, the Justice Department, the Department of Homeland Security, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the US Border Patrol, and state and city government policies that respond to federal policies.

Latest Immigration Posts

 

Remote Learning Projected to Increase Inequality in Education Achievement

Remote Learning Projected to Increase Inequality in Education Achievement

Brief #104

Remote Learning Projected to Increase Inequality in Education Achievement

Rosalind Gottfried        

Education, Inequality, Stimulus Relief

January 2, 2021

Policy

Demographic inequities characteristic of American society continue to  grow in different sectors. In education the widespread shift to remote learning will have a dramatic impact on students,  long after the virus has been controlled and students returned to the classroom.   Young students are more likely to suffer setbacks from remote learning, especially in reading, which is a challenging subject to learn even in the classroom. It becomes even more difficult after third grade when education shifts from learning to read to reading to learn.

The first comprehensive study on the impact of remote learning was released in December and showed that disadvantaged students are significantly more at risk from remote learning as well as more likely to be learning exclusively, or primarily, remotely.  Remote learning only schools affected  36% of white students; 51% for Black students; 60% for Latino students; and 64% for Asian students.   Overall, two thirds of the students of color live in districts where remote only education is occurring.  Large cities, generally clustered in more Democratic voting states, tended to have more schools closed (opting for remote learning only) and to educate a greater proportion of at-risk students.  Rural schools, especially in less densely populated states serving a greater proportion of white students were more likely to have “mostly open” campuses.

Lower income students suffer on multiple fronts.  They are more likely to have parents facing unemployment; increased poverty rates; increased food insecurity; lack of internet access; lack of space for study; and less access to parental or tutor support.  The long term harm is difficult to assess but predicted to be extensive.  Some dire predictions of achievement drops from last spring were assessed as better than anticipated.  In one early study, reading scores did not drop and math scores dropped less than predicted, about 14%.  However, the fear is that many students at risk did not take the tests resulting in skewed outcomes.

Parental surveys indicate that low income children are ten times more likely to be lacking in attendance at remote learning than children of parents making over 100,000 dollars.  Fifteen million children have unreliable internet access. Only two thirds of students have access to broadband internet.  Two thirds to three quarters of teachers report their students are less engaged in their remote learning than when in the classroom and that levels fell further as the semester progressed.  Low income and non-white students are reportedly less likely to engage in remote learning regularly. On the plus side, some small number of students report benefits from online learning.  These re most likely “atypical learners” and “self-starters” who enjoy the lack of peer distraction and gain focus when they can manage their own time.

Research indicates that low income teens spend more time in on screen activities, an average of 8 hours and 7 minutes compared to 5 hours and 42 minutes among higher income teens.  Screen time is associated with negative outcomes in education and mental health and may indicate a significant detriment to students who depend on it for too much of the day.  In some affluent areas, such as Silicon Valley, there is a growing trend to remove screens from children and teens during school day and return to more exclusively human interactive classrooms and play based preschools.  At the same time, some publically funded initiatives are promoting online preschool in more rural states such as Utah, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Idaho, and Montana.  Some technology companies, such as Apple and Google, actively solicit business from school districts in the hope that gaining a foothold with young children will garner lifelong brand loyalty.

Analysis

There are myriad fixes to stem the repercussions of remote learning.  These would include supporting low income parents by providing paid parental leave; increase internet access; increase distribution of computers; pair students with college students and graduates for tutoring; establish learning pods and publically funded learning hubs; assure adequate food access; increase SNAP access; and develop a more defined federal program for stemming the pandemic.  The December stimulus bill makes some strides in this direction but not nearly enough.  It does include 54 billion dollars for school aid, four times more than in the March 2019 CARES program.  However, the cost of funding the system has increased because of reduced tax revenues from business losses and decreases in student enrollment.   The stimulus included seven billion for broadband internet access and school meal programs but provided no money for state and local governments to help with corona virus costs.  Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell justified this lack by stating that to aid localities would be to bailout “fiscally irresponsible states.”

Estimates suggest a 200 billion dollar loss of education funding.An estimated 6% of public school students are not attending school and private and charter schools are further siphoning money from mainstream public schools as their enrollments increase.  So far the direst consequences of these losses have been avoided due to consistent property tax revenues and reserves that states utilized.  Some states are moving to increase capital gains taxes and taxes on insurers to promote greater revenue.  Additionally, to preserve school funding some jurisdictions are using pre-pandemic student numbers to inform their budgets for the 2021-22 school year. The next year’s financial viability promises to be more in jeopardy as local and state budgets suffer from the lack of federal aid.  President elect Biden has set a goal of opening schools in his first 100 days in office but such a move would require federal relief and his ability to gain that from Congress is tenuous, at best.  Something should be done, policy wise, or the country will suffer the future costs related to under education, such as reduced income tax; unemployment; poor health outcomes; and decreased life expectancy.

LEARN MORE

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/24/us/remote-learning-student-income.html?campaign_id=45&emc=edit_nk_20210102&instance_id=25593&nl=nicholas-kristof&regi_id=56728292&segment_id=48235&te=1&user_id=21f09ddec1cb7d394a657d123c5ed4dc

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/22/us/public-schools-enrollment-stimulus.html?action=click&pgtype=Article&state=default&module=styln-coronavirus-schools-reopening&region=MAIN_CONTENT_3&context=storyline_keepup_recirc

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/how-we-rise/2020/09/23/students-of-color-most-likely-to-be-learning-online-districts-must-work-even-harder-on-race-equity/

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/06/nyregion/nyc-remote-learning.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/09/11/magazine/covid-school-reopenings.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/20/nyregion/coronavirus-students-schools.html?action=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

Trump Administration Impedes Search for Migrant Children’s Parents ACLU Tells USRESIST NEWS

Trump Administration Impedes Search for Migrant Children’s Parents ACLU Tells USRESIST NEWS

Immigration Brief # 112

Trump Administration Impedes Search for Migrant Children’s Parents ACLU Tells USRESIST NEWS

By Linda F. Hersey

December 18, 2020

The Trump administration withheld key contact information for locating the deported parents of 666 immigrant children detained in the U.S., according to an attorney with the ACLU, which is representing the separated families in a class action lawsuit against U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

Daniel Galindo, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, accuses the Trump administration of “obstructive” activities that impede searches and hinder efforts to reunite families and put them on a path to citizenship.

“What people are rightly asking and wondering is, how were these circumstances inflicted on these families, and why isn’t the federal government doing right by them?” said Galindo, in an interview with U.S. Resist News.

Advocates with the ACLU have located relatives for 168 of the 666 children, though the family member often is not the parent. Galindo said the outreach involves trust-building with the children’s relatives.

“We have the beginning of an answer in many of the cases,” Galindo said. Parents, fearful of arrest by the U.S. or violence in their home country, often are difficult to locate. “We may be able to reach a parent’s brother who explains the family situation and that the parent is in hiding,” he said, which complicates the situation and delays court efforts to reunite the families.

The ACLU and other civil rights groups argue that the Trump administration has engaged in misinformation to justify anti-immigration policies that violate due process and federal law protecting asylum seekers.

The ACLU lawsuit focuses on the experience of a parent fleeing violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo, who was forcibly separated from her 7-year-old daughter in the U.S. They were detained 2,000 miles apart.

While the mother and child were reunited, the ACLU case, filed in 2018, has advanced as a class action lawsuit for 666 children that U.S. border agents separated from their parents.

Misinformation Campaign Waged to ‘Criminalize Immigrants’

The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights (CHIRLA), which provides legal help to immigrants, argues that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) under Trump has waged an “image campaign to criminalize immigrants” that the administration “made the centerpiece of its narrative.”

“We must rethink immigration enforcement,” the California-based coalition urges on its website. “The point should not be maximizing suffering and tearing apart immigrant families.”

The coalition also criticized the level of funding increases that Homeland Security received under Trump for tracking, arresting and detaining undocumented individuals. The DHS budget for immigration enforcement has nearly doubled to $30 billion in five years, the coalition reported.

Damages Sought for Forced Separations

The ACLU is seeking damages for the anguish that 666 children identified as plaintiffs in the class action lawsuit suffered by the forced separations. The ACLU also is seeking a legal path to citizenship for the children and their parents.

Most of the families are from South and Central America and were detained as they entered the U.S. from Mexico. The task now, according to the ACLU, is to find the parents separated from their children and deported by U.S. border agents.

Under Trump’s zero tolerance policy, hundreds of children – including some as young as infants and toddlers — were taken from undocumented parents, in 2017 and 2018, and held in detention centers, sometimes for months and often under harsh conditions. Many of those children were not reunited with their parents. They were placed with court-approved sponsors, in cities across the U.S., who were not always a relative or parent.

Galindo said that the Trump administration deliberately withheld information that ICE collected on the parents’ whereabouts, which only now is being discovered during court arguments in the class action lawsuit.

Biden Expected to Provide Path to Legal Status

He described the federal government’s data on the deported adults and their children as “haphazardly collected.”

The government, for example, may have originally provided searchers with the address of a U.S. detention facility where an undocumented parent was held, when it had more up-to-date information on the parent post-release but withheld it.

“The Trump Administration has persistently not provided information that would be useful,” Galindo noted. “The latest example is of the government now coming forward with data from court proceedings that will prove useful but should have been turned over quite some time ago.”

Delays and incomplete information have an impact, making it harder for advocates to connect children with families and slow down asylum proceedings in the U.S.

Galindo said the incoming Biden administration has said publicly it will take a different approach toward immigration but has yet to define it.

“We are advocating that they pursue enduring ways to do right by these families,” Galindo said, “including a pathway to legal status and returning families that want to return.”

Engagement Resources

Trump’s Final Attempts at a Border Wall

Trump’s Final Attempts at a Border Wall

Brief #111 – Immigration

By Kathryn Baron 

Trump’s Final Attempts at a Border Wall

December 15,2020

Policy Summary

President Trump has barely kept his campaign promise of building a wall along the US Southern Border but has successfully constructed 415 miles of border wall. The Administration is expected to reach 450 miles by the end of the year, working at insane speeds. Allegedly, an illegal dirt road was built to speed up the operation and prevent any disruption in the flow of construction.

Additionally, two whistleblowers accused contractors building Trump’s border wall of smuggling armed Mexican security teams into the US to guard construction sites as Trump attempts to finish his border wall before leaving office.

Analysis

The motive behind building this wall remains to deter drug traffickers, human smugglers, and criminal organizations despite proven statistics showing a substantial amount of drugs trafficked into the US are through legal ports of entry. This frantic effort to make “good” on the Trump Administration’s principal promise is a desperate attempt to cling to its xenophobic values and maintain the support of Trump’s bigoted support base.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • The ACLU: a non-profit with a longstanding commitment to preserving and protecting the individual rights and liberties the Constitution and US laws guarantee all its citizens. You can also donate monthly to counter Trump’s attacks on people’s rights. Recently, the ACLU has filed a lawsuit challenging the separation of families at the border.
  • Center for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
Victory for Dreamers Amidst Presidential Turnover

Victory for Dreamers Amidst Presidential Turnover

December 15, 2020

Policy Summary

Following Brief #108, a Federal Judge recently ordered the Trump Administration to fully restore DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals). The Administration is supposed to allow newly eligible immigrants to file new applications for protections under DACA and reverse the memorandum issued unlawfully by Chad Wolf earlier in the summer. As many as 300,000 new applicants might now be eligible in light of the newest ruling. The Judge also asserted the government must find a way to inform all eligible immigrants of this change.

Analysis

This ruling poses a significant legal setback to President Trump’s long-standing attempts to terminate the Obama-era program. If the order still stands by the time Joe Biden takes office, it will be easier for him to reinstate DACA, as he has promised in his campaign.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • The ACLU: a non-profit with a longstanding commitment to preserving and protecting the individual rights and liberties the Constitution and US laws guarantee all its citizens. You can also donate monthly to counter Trump’s attacks on people’s rights. Recently, the ACLU has filed a lawsuit challenging the separation of families at the border.
  • Center for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
President-Elect Joe Biden’s Immigration Plans

President-Elect Joe Biden’s Immigration Plans

President-Elect Joe Biden’s Immigration Plans

November 22, 2020

Policy Overview
President Elect, Joe Biden has hefty goals for immigration reform and policies. After election, he seeks to undo much of the Trump Administration’s initiatives and policies he found to be detrimental to our core values. On his first day in office, Biden pledges to make DACA permanent and provide a road map to citizenship for people illegally living in the US within his first 100 days. Biden plans to end construction on Trump’s border wall immediately, raise the cap of refugees admitted to 125,000 in 2021, eliminate the practice of separating families at the border, and end the current travel bans on certain Muslim-majority countries.

Biden proposes a high-tech approach to the US border rather than a physical barrier. He wants to enlist the cooperation of a network of organizations, non-governmental organizations, legal non-profits, and refugee assistance agencies to assess the humanitarian needs of migrants. He seeks to expand existing opportunities for immigrants who served in the US Armed Forces, immigrants already residing in the US, and for expanded legal immigration through family-, work-, and humanitarian-based visas. Through these efforts, Biden aims to modernize the American immigration system and uphold its status as a global beacon of freedom and asylum.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • World Health Organization: the WHO provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and global responses
  • Center for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
Court Rules Against Trump’s Unlawful Shutdown of DACA

Court Rules Against Trump’s Unlawful Shutdown of DACA

November 22, 2020

Policy Summary

In June 2020, the Supreme Court barred the Trump Administration from carrying out a plan to shut down DACA (see brief #95). The Obama Administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) allowed nearly 800,000 young people – “Dreamers” – to avoid deportation and remain in the United States to work and study.

In July, the Department of Homeland Security – under Acting Secretary, Chad Wolf – issued a memorandum that effectively suspended the DACA program. The memorandum violated the Administrative Procedure Act and was capricious in nature. Last week, a Federal Judge in New York upheld this decision and declared the memorandum unlawful as Wolf was not lawfully serving as Acting Secretary. He was installed as a part of a series of several hasty actions to get people to the top of the Department through circumventing standard procedures. Therefore, he not only lacked the authority to hold his temporary position, but his actions were also void.

Analysis
This decision serves as an undeniable reminder that the Trump Administration is not exempt from the Rule of Law and cannot bypass official procedures. The efforts to reverse the DACA program were amongst its greatest pledges and the Supreme Court judgment firmly asserts the American Dream and core values are more important than acquiescing to a fanatical administration. President Elect Joe Biden has vowed to reinstate the original Obama era program when he assumes office.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • World Health Organization: the WHO provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and global responses
  • Center for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
An Update on the Status of the 666 Immigrant Children Separate from Their Parents

An Update on the Status of the 666 Immigrant Children Separate from Their Parents

By  Linda F. Hersey

November 16, 2020

USRESIST NEWS has made an effort to track down the whereabouts of the 666 immigrant children separated from their parents but no one is really sure. To the best of our knowledge some are in ICE detention centers, some are in foster homes, some with relatives but sadly it is difficult to really know even the names of the children and where they are.

A federal  court-ordered search for deported families separated from their children at the U.S. border is severely hampered by the Trump administration’s refusal to fund location efforts and a failure to collect the most basic information on the families, such as a phone number.

The ACLU and other civil rights groups, meanwhile, complain that the federal government is continuing to separate families at the border and sending children to detention centers that operate with little outside oversight and under harsh conditions.

“A recent spike in apprehensions of migrant children crossing the U.S. southern border without a parent or guardian threatened to overwhelm the systems set up to care for them, and reinvigorated debate over the detention of minors,” the Council on Foreign Relations reported in a formal statement issued in October 2020. “Critics, including many in Congress, say the administration’s response is exacerbating a humanitarian crisis in Central America, breaking U.S. law, and violating international human rights norms,” the council concluded.

The Council on Foreign Relations reports that six children have died in the custody of immigration authorities since 2018. There is scant information on the conditions of their detainment or circumstances that led to their deaths.

The incoming Biden administration has pledged to establish a task force whose mission is to overturn many of Trump’s anti-immigration policies and reunite the families, though there has been no promise of asylum.

No budget under Trump to find deported parents

The Biden administration will have a large task in tracking down the parents of the 666 children orphaned under the so-called “zero tolerance” policy created by the Trump administration. The policy was implemented in July 2017 and stopped by court order in June 2018. According to the federal government, the children are with sponsors who are extended family members or caretakers assigned by the courts.

The Trump administration has not allocated a budget to cover finding and reuniting the families, with most of the location work done by volunteers, including attorneys, child advocates and religion-based organizations.

The Trump administration did little to document the background of the children forcibly removed from their parents – with some infants and toddlers taken from the arms of their mothers and fathers.  The ACLU has argued the government has been unable to provide any documentation that would enable advocates to “allow meaningful searches” to identify and find the parents.

The government does not have phone numbers or know the location of the children’s homes. Families separated from their children often are concerned about reprisal, and have not come forward. When contacted some parents have elected to leave children with relatives and sponsors in the U.S. where they are safer.

Many of the children are young. More than 125 children were under the age of five, when they were taken from their families in 2018.

Some children were placed hundreds and thousands of miles away, in so-called detention centers, such as the Homestead Temporary Center for Unaccompanied Children, in Florida, which was run by a for-profit company, Caliburn International.

For-Profit Centers Detain Children

The displaced children are at the center of a class-action lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union against the federal government that names as defendants ICE, the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement and U.S. Immigration and Customs. The ACLU is seeking damages for the defendants, including coverage of mental health treatment because of the trauma the children and parents suffered from forced separations. The goal of the ACLU also is to end new separations and reunite the youngsters with their families, in the United States.

Overall, the majority of immigrant children in federal custody are 15 years or older. These children arrived in the U.S. without an adult sponsor or were separated from their families at the U.S. border.

The Trump administration is accused of directing children into for-profit centers like the one in Homestead, rather than placing them with sponsors or nonprofit agencies that provide foster care. There is a large network of migrant detention centers in the U.S., with little outside oversight and anecdotal reports by parents and children of unsafe and harsh conditions.

Comprehensive Health Services, a subsidiary of Caliburn, had a $30 million contract to run the Homestead shelter at a cost of $1 million per day. The property sits next to a Superfund site that stores toxic waste, including arsenic and lead. A report by the Miami Herald revealed that the children’s detention center was never tested to ensure that chemicals were not leaching into their environment.

The federal government emptied the center in 2019 after press reports and photos drew wide-scale criticism and questions about the safety and welfare of the youngsters housed there. Officials claimed that the children were released to sponsors but there has been no real outside verification or accounting of all the children who were taken from parents, detained and then released.

Negative publicity had included one report about a young girl who ran away from the facility and was discovered hiding and weeping inside a filling station.  The center, often referred to as a children’s prison, became a disturbing symbol of the practices of the Trump administration of separating children from their parents immigrating from Central America.

Before the facility was shut down, it was estimated to be holding about a quarter of the immigrant children in federal custody, after they arrived in the U.S. alone or had been separated from their parents at the border. After a congressional delegation toured the facility in 2019, Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland told reporters, “The Trump Administration’s actions at the southern border are grotesque and dehumanizing.”

Resistance Resources

American Civil Liberties Union has a mission to “realize the promise of the U.S. Constitution for all and expand the reach of its guarantees,

www.Aclu.org

Women’s Refugee Commission works to hold the U.S. government accountable and to ensure refugee children and families are treated humanely and fairly.

www.Eecommission.org

Council on Foreign Relations is an independent nonpartisan think tank that helps people and organizations better understand foreign policy choices facing the U.S.

www.cfr.org

Trump Adviser’s Ties to Anti-Immigration Policies and Hate Groups Scrutinized

Trump Adviser’s Ties to Anti-Immigration Policies and Hate Groups Scrutinized

Brief # 106 Immigration

Trump Adviser’s Ties to Anti-Immigration Policies and  Hate Groups Scrutinized

By Linda F. Hersey

October 29, 2020

SUMMARY

The Administration’s abject failure to secure identifying information on hundreds of migrant parents separated from their children at the U.S. border in 2018 raises new questions about the role of Stephen Miller, Trump’s senior adviser and chief architect of the plan, as well as Miller’s documented connections to organizations designated as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

In a 2018 interview with The New York Times, Miller described as a “simple decision” the practice implemented by the Administration to separate parents from their children by deporting the adults and forcing the families to leave their youngsters behind, often in detention and facing an uncertain future.

That practice is under intense scrutiny again, as lawyers and advocates report that they cannot locate parents of 545 of those youngsters, whose lives are in limbo in the United States, including some who were infants when their parents were deported.

A primary reason for the challenges in finding the parents may be fear of reprisal by the U.S.

Published news reports in 2019 revealed that Miller sought to use the orphaned children to further target undocumented adults in the U.S. He advocated a plan to embed border agents in refugee agencies working to unite the youngsters with extended family members living in the U.S. after the parents were forced to leave and return to their home countries in Central America, according to the Washington Post.

The Department of Health and Human Services rejected efforts to embed the border agents at agencies whose mission and goal is to reunify the children with relatives already in the U.S., no matter their immigration status.

“Congress has made clear that it does not want those who come forward as potential sponsors of minors in U.S. custody to be frightened away by possible deportation,” the Washington Post reported in 2019 when the secret plan was revealed. “But, in the reasoning of senior Trump administration officials [including Miller], adults denied custody of children lose their status as ‘potential sponsors’ and are fair game for arrest,” the newspaper reported. Under the plan, ICE would have collected fingerprints, DNA and other information from people seeking to claim migrant children in government custody as relatives. If the claim was not supported, ICE could use the information as intelligence to potentially arrest and deport the individual.

The Southern Poverty Law Center in October 2020 is raising questions again about Miller’s role in the most controversial anti-immigration policies by the Trump Administration as well as his connections to identified hate groups, including the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) and the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS).  Miller was a keynote speaker in 2015 at a CIS convention. Miller has expressed support for the ideology and writings of John Tanton, the founder of FAIR.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, “FAIR leaders have ties to white supremacist groups and eugenicists and have made many racist statements.”  The group wants to “limit the number of nonwhites who enter” the United States, the law center reports.

Miller – in 900 emails sent to Bretibart News and later published by the New York Times – espoused his support for leaders of CIS and FAIR, and for other identified white nationalists and Far Right groups.  Numerous other media outlets also dug into the emails and published similar stories, including Newsweek and Sludge, a political news website.

“Leaked emails from White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller from 2015-2016 reveal an obsession with white nationalism, the Confederacy and the denigration of black and Hispanic communities,” Newsweek reported in December 2019.

Civil rights groups have stepped into the fray to advocate for immigrants experiencing threats of deportation and other legal barriers in the immigration system. Those groups include the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights, based in San Francisco.

The group described immigration policies under the Trump Administration as “increasingly punitive.”

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights strives to “address the unmet legal needs of immigrants and, in doing so, to combat the civil rights issues plaguing the current immigration enforcement system,” according to its website.

ANALYSIS

Dozens of leading civil rights groups – a total of 59 — signed a letter demanding that Trump end Miller’s advisory role, according to The Daily Beast.

But that did not happen. Miller, a key Administration adviser, has had a pivotal role in shaping the harshest of anti-immigration policies under Trump, which span the deportation of parents without their children, a Supreme Court-challenged effort to end DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) and another court-challenged policy to stop visas for individuals from Muslim-majority countries.

“Donald Trump and Stephen Miller have a  view on immigration that is very different from [what] Republicans have traditionally believed,” said Alex Conant, former spokesman for U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, in an article published by The Guardian newspaper in  2017. Rubio, a Republican, came under attack by Miller, which was revealed in emails, when the Cuban-American senator explored a presidential bid in 2015.

Now Miller is back in the news as lawyers and human rights groups continue efforts to locate the families of 545 children displaced under the “zero tolerance” policy initiated and championed by Miller.

Resistance Resources

The Southern Poverty Law Center: Southern Poverty Law Center’s mission is to fight racial injustice and to oppose white supremacy, while advancing the rights of all people.

https://www.splcenter.org/

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights: The coalition includes 200 national organizations that work to support civil and human rights.

https://civilrights.org/heres-10-things-you-can-do-to-stop-white-supremacy/

Crime and Justice Institute: “A Framework for Public Safety” Report details how to protect U.S. communities during and after the 2020 presidential election.

https://www.cjinstitute.org/publication/elections/

The United Nations offers suggestions for overcoming racism and defending human rights in your community.

https://www.un.org/en/letsfightracism/

Children Remain Separated from their Families, as Election Nears

Children Remain Separated from their Families, as Election Nears

Brief #105 – Immigration

By Kathryn Baron

Children Remain Separated from their Families, as Election Nears

October 28, 2020

Policy Summary

In June 2018, a Federal Judge in San Diego delivered an order that children in government custody were to be reunited with their families. Volunteers, human rights defenders, and attorneys have worked tirelessly to locate and reunite families, but 545 children remain separated still. These children were separated from their families between July 2017 and June 2018. It is estimated that two-thirds of the parents of these remaining 545 were deported and sent back to their home countries without their children.

Analysis

Efforts to locate still-separated family members has been hindered by recent COVID-19 lockdowns and social-distancing measures both in the US and abroad. Volunteers have gone door to door in Guatemala and Honduras – where many of these parents are believed to be – as US government tracking systems had proven to be subpar. The US government failed to maintain accurate, reliable, and comprehensive data surrounding children separated from their parents at the US Southern Border under the Trump Administration’s Zero Tolerance Policy. In addition to this shortcoming, there are local roadblocks in Guatemala and Honduras that volunteers have faced: remote villages and limited access to technology, gang-controlled regions, and most recently, COVID-19.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • The ACLU: a non-profit with a longstanding commitment to preserving and protecting the individual rights and liberties the Constitution and US laws guarantee all its citizens. You can also donate monthly to counter Trump’s attacks on people’s rights. Recently, the ACLU has filed a lawsuit challenging the separation of families at the border.
  • Centers for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
Trump Adviser’s Ties to Anti-Immigration Policies and Hate Groups Scrutinized

Nearly Half a Million Immigrants Face Deportation – The End of Temporary Protected Status

Policy Summary

In Los Angeles a Federal Appeals Court ruled the Trump Administration acted lawfully in terminating the Temporary Protected Status of hundreds of thousands of immigrants. These protections have allowed immigrants to live and work in the US after fleeing conflict and/or natural disasters in their home countries. The recent 2-1 ruling strips the legal immigration status from at least 400,000 individuals of Salvadorian origin, thus rendering them deportable if they do not leave voluntarily. Other countries that fall under TPS include Syria, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, Nicaragua, Nepal, Honduras, Haiti, and Yemen.

Analysis
Beneficiaries of the program have about 200,000 US born children, so families could again be separated. More than 100,000 of the protected individuals work in essential fields: healthcare (at least 11,000), food-related (at least 76,000). The deportation of these migrants could negatively impact several aspects of the US economy and health system. However, if President Trump is not re-elected, the new administration may choose to uphold and continue the program.

Engagement Resources

  • The National Immigration Law Center: an organization that exclusively dedicates itself to defending and furthering the rights of low income immigrants and strives to educate decision makers on the impacts and effects of their policies on this overlooked part of the population.
  • Border Network for Human Rights: network to engage education, organization and participation of border communities to defend human rights and work towards a society where everyone is equal in rights and dignity.
  • The ACLU: a non-profit with a longstanding commitment to preserving and protecting the individual rights and liberties the Constitution and US laws guarantee all its citizens. You can also donate monthly to counter Trump’s attacks on people’s rights. Recently, the ACLU has filed a lawsuit challenging the separation of families at the border.
  • Center for Disease Control: the CDC provides updated information surrounding COVID-19 and the US responses
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