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Brief # 42: Foreign Policy

Summary

Last Thursday, President Trump announced the cancellation of the historic US-North Korea summit, originally slated for June 12th in Singapore. The cited reason was the “open hostility” exhibited by the North Korean government, including the suggestion that a diplomatic failure would lead to a “nuclear to nuclear showdown”. These comments were in response to recent threats by Vice President Pence that North Korea could end up like Libya if they failed to make a deal.

Trump’s cancellation of the summit provoked a disappointed and conciliatory response from North Korea, who stated that they were “willing to sit face to face at any time”. Trump called it a “very nice statement” which would lead “hopefully to long and enduring prosperity and peace”. As for the future of the summit, Trump stated that “We’ll see what happens. It could even be the 12th”. On Saturday, Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in held a surprise summit, during which Moon said there had been a candid exchange of views, and made plans for another meeting this Friday. The North Korean state media declared that they would meet frequently in the future “to make dialogue brisk and pool wisdom and efforts, expressing their stand to make joint efforts for the denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula”. The White House has confirmed that a team of officials have departed for Singapore to prepare for the possible summit. On Wednesday night, North Korean General Kim Yong-chol met with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in New York, for what Pompeo tweeted was discussions for the “potential” upcoming summit.

Analysis

Peace talks between North Korea and the US would be an enormous step forward for world peace. The hostility between the two nations, and the militarism it creates has led to brutal living conditions for the North Korean people, and a world living under the threat of nuclear war. The diplomatic process needs to be approached with care and patience, two qualities which our President has failed to exhibit thus far. By allowing his administration to continue to name-drop Libya, he’s putting any hopes of diplomacy in jeopardy. In Libya, Gaddafi agreed to a denuclearisation deal, similar to what Trump hopes to accomplish with North Korea. Once Gaddafi gave up his weapons, he was killed by US supported rebels. Any mention of Libya will only threaten to ruin any hope for a deal. North Korea needs to have US sanctions lifted. so they can finally be allowed some economic breathing room.

Resistance Resources

  • Read a Previous USRESIST Assessment of the North Korean Peace Process: Here is the brief, published earlier this month. (NOTE KIM PLEASE MAKE THE LINK TO COLIN’S LAST BRIEFG)
  • Donate to Peace Action: Peace Action is a network of peace activists committed to pressuring Congress into passing legislation supporting a foreign policy which respects human rights and non-violence. You can donate on their website.

This Brief was compiled by Colin Shanley. If you have comments or want to add the name of your organization to this Brief please contact Colin@usresistnews.org.

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